Sonic Mania (Switch) Review

A New Genesis

Sonic is truly the little hedgehog that could. As the most popular Sega mascot, he went head-to-head against Nintendo’s Mario for years, combatting the mustachioed plumber’s powered-up platforming with speed and style. After a handful of classic 2D Genesis platformers and divisive 3D titles, Sonic couldn’t keep up. Sega began giving the blue blur more side characters and gimmicky gameplay styles but ultimately gave fans less of what they wanted. The infamous Sonic loop was in place and would remain until Christian Whitehead came along. Whitehead, a passionate fan who developed his own engine to mod and later port Sonic games, helmed the development of a new celebratory Sonic game—by fans for fans. With the help of PagodaWest Games and Headcannon, known throughout the fan community, Sonic Mania has zoomed into existence – and it plays like a dream.

Here’s the Video Version for your viewing pleasure! With some added fun callbacks!

Like in the old 16-bit games, you play as none other than Sonic the Hedgehog (by himself or alongside his high-flying fox buddy Tails). You can also play as Tails by himself, or as the air-gliding, wall-climbing Knuckles. Regardless of your character, you blaze across stages rushing down ramps, going though loops, and bouncing off springs. Along the way, you can collect rings, which act as both collectibles and your life bar. Get hit once, and you lose all your rings. If you don’t have any rings and get hit, you lose a life. In addition to the standard run and jump gameplay, Sonic and friends can also perform a spin dash to build up momentum.

Sonic Mania Switch Review Green Hill Zone.jpg
Has the Sonic cycle finally been broken?

Sonic Mania should feel familiar to anyone who has played the original trilogy; and that’s no understatement, as Whitehead’s engine replicates the classic Genesis-era games’ physics. Unlike other 2D modern Sonic titles where Sonic stops moving once you let go, Mania has that exhilarating sense of momentum that constantly propels you forward, forcing you to react quickly if you want to achieve maximum speed. And despite racing at supersonic speed, I never felt overwhelmed, thanks in part to the multiple paths in each stage, a series mainstay. Make death-defying jumps at top speed, and you are rewarded with the blazing top path. Make too many mistakes, and you will find yourself in the stage’s bottom portion, which is typically slower-paced but also rife with deadly hazards and bottomless pits.

Speaking of stages, they’re another reason why Sonic Mania will feel familiar to fans. There are 12 zones, each with two acts. However, eight of the zones are taken from older games including the first Sonic the Hedgehog and Sonic CD, leaving only four completely new areas. This sounds much worse than it is. The eight returning zones are heavily remixed, implementing both old and new stage gimmicks. For instance, Chemical Plant Zone introduces gelatinous bouncy platforms in addition to the characteristic warp tubes. Some levels even mix and match implements of different zones together. As a result, every stage feels fresh, while satiating your nostalgic taste buds at the same time. Consequently, the new areas are amazing and introduce impressive set pieces and elegant design. I still can’t get enough of Studiopolis Zone’s glass-shattering silhouette rooms, satellite wave travel, and giant popcorn machines. They’re ridiculously fun to play through, and the biggest shame is that there aren’t more of them.

Sonic Mania Switch Review Studiopolis Zone.jpg
The new Studiopolis Zone is gorgeous!

Each act ends with a boss fight against Dr. Eggman, I mean, Robotnik, or one of his lackeys. If you must know, the simple story involves the evil doctor sending Sonic through time and space. As a simple reason to explain why Sonic is retreading Green Hill Zone, there’s no real significance beyond a few short dialogue-less cutscenes. Either way, Dr. Eggman’s robotic bosses are very inspired, and some original encounters actually left me speechless.

Sonic Mania Switch Review Dr. Eggman Robotnik.jpg
Seems Dr. Eggman was also left speechless.

Unfortunately, I encountered several glitches in the game, one following Zone 2: Act 2’s boss. After defeating the boss, I somehow became stuck in the background, finally escaping after about a minute of desperate button mashing. In another instance, I got stuck in the foreground and had to restart the stage. While neither glitch is game-breaking, there are enough issues to raise an eyebrow and taint the overall experience.

At 12 zones, the game isn’t very long, but I found it easy to pick up and play a single stage through the time attack mode. The game’s sense of speed is unrivaled and an adrenaline rush to blaze through. Replaying as Tails or Knuckles with their special abilities also added to my playtime. In Knuckles’ case, there is even an extra stage and some exclusive pathways. As you would expect, simply beating the game isn’t enough; seeking out hidden bonus levels and Chaos Emeralds is the only way to complete the game. And yes, the Blue Sphere bonus game is back, along with the UFO-catching race from Sonic CD.

Sonic Mania Switch Review Blue Sphere.jpg
Fans of Blue Sphere rejoice!

As is the case with the popular indie game Shovel Knight, Sonic Mania manages to invoke nostalgia through its presentation, even though its visuals and soundtrack are leaps and bounds above what the Genesis could produce. The 16-bit visuals are filled to the brink with eye-catching backgrounds and beautiful pixel-art. The new stages, in particular, are glowing with fun light tricks and hidden references. All of the classic upbeat tunes have been lovingly remixed with a smooth jazz flavor by Tee Lopes, a video game remixer. And my goodness is that opening animation gorgeous.

Sonic Mania Switch Review Press Garden Zone.jpg
GOTTA GO FAST!

Conclusion

There’s a reason I began this review with an overview of how this game came into being. Chock full of references and tributes to the entire franchise, Sonic Mania is a love letter to anyone who’s grown up with Sega and a representative display of what the series should stand for to newcomers. There are some chinks in the armor, but the game otherwise runs at supersonic speed. Christian Whitehead and the development team have injected their hearts into this passion project, creating an experience by fans for fans, and their love for Sonic rings loud.

Score: 9/10

What are your thoughts on Sonic Mania? What do you think of the Sonic franchise as a whole? What are your favorite Sonic the Hedgehog games? What would you like to see with the series moving forward? More 2D? 3D? Big the Cat?! Please share any thoughts and questions you have in the comments section below! Thank you so much for reading and watching!

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67 thoughts on “Sonic Mania (Switch) Review

  1. How dare Sega imitate our opening jingle! 😛 Loved the review! It’s definitely a game made by fans for fans. It tries hard to capture the nostalgia while offering something fresh too. I like the retro look and I’m glad it lives up to expectations. It sticks to what makes Sonic good and doesn’t try to include elements that don’t fit (like realistic-looking humans). I guess you can’t beat the classics. I didn’t grow up with Sega, but I’m interested in giving this a try. Hopefully, it’s not too fast for me! Btw, nice rapping. ^_-

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hahaha, yes, how dare they…? 😛 Thanks as always! I know neither of us grew up with Sega, but I do respect Sanic! 😛 Err… I mean Sonic. I’m just happy that fans of the old-school 2D platformers finally get a new game that pays tribute to what made the series great while moving forward with excellent level design and physics. I’m wondering how Sonic Forces will turn out. And I’m glad you liked the rapping! I knew you’d like the voices, too. Hahaha! ;)

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Want proof that 2017 has been an incredible year in gaming? There was an unequivocally good Sonic game released this year. Granted, I haven’t exactly finished it, but I’ve been impressed so far. I wasn’t expecting there to be a boss at the end of each stage like in Sonic 3, but it’s awesome they did that. For that matter, I wasn’t expecting Puyo Puyo to be one of the boss fights, but that was a nice callback. Good thing it wasn’t as difficult as the real one or I would’ve been toast!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hahaha, yes! Sure, Zelda was great and Mario will likely be amazing. But for Sonic to finally be good again? Truly 2017 is a miraculous year for gaming, hahaha! I like the touch of having a boss in each act, especially considering the bosses are very creative this time around. As you said, the Puyo Puyo boss made me so happy, as a fan of the old Kirby’s Avalanche and Dr. Robotnik’s Mean Bean Machine. Was not expecting that at all! Shame that I glitched right after it, though… There are a bunch of other callbacks that I don’t get as much as someone who became a Sonic fan after he went third party. But I still appreciate how much of a fan-centric game this is.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I visited a friend recently who was excited they had picked this up. So they had me sit down, and play it for an hour. I enjoyed what I saw. It really does hearken back to the old Genesis/Mega Drive titles. So longtime fans will eat this up.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Awesome! That’s a good friend you have! I don’t actually have nostalgia for the old Sonic games (obviously I’m a Nintendo guy haha) beyond having played them all on the GameCube Sonic Mega Collection, but I respect the old games and loved what I have played. Sonic Mania is truly the closest example to a good modern-day 2D Sonic. It plays much better than Sonic the Hedgehog 4, now that the physics are how they should be. Using plenty of the older zones helps drive that nostalgic feeling for many who grew up with Sega systems, I’m sure! Did you grow up playing the old games?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Well growing up I started out on the mighty Atari 2600 (VCS). So when I was a lad I was playing awesome games like Berzerk, and Demon Attack. When I got a little bit older though the family got a Commodore 64, which instantly became my favorite platform ever. The range of stuff on there is nothing short of amazing. It had exclusives. It had excellent ports of arcade games, IBM computer games, and even console games. Of course in 1989 we finally got an NES, which I also love. And I never had any of the Sega platforms growing up. But I had friends who did, and many of the Sega arcade, and Master System games made their way to the C64 as well. When I was in high school the Super NES Vs. Sega Genesis war was in full swing, and I had the Super NES. So obviously I was biased toward that as it’s what I owned. But that didn’t mean I didn’t like the Genesis. I loved playing Sega’s machine when I visited anyone who had one. It had great ports of Sega’s own arcade games, stuff like Road Rash, Truxton, Vectorman, Streets Of Rage, and obviously Sonic The Hedgehog. All of those games are super fun.

        This game, is pretty much what old school Sega Genesis Sonic fans have wanted for twenty years. I’m glad that they also put it up on Steam along with the ROMs of the old games. Maybe now Sega will do the unthinkable, and make a proper Alex Kidd. (I’m old.)

        Liked by 1 person

      2. That’s awesome! Thanks for sharing your story! I never got to play an Atari system or a Commodore 64 so consider yourself lucky! I grew up with the NES, followed by the SNES. I didn’t know a lot about the Sega Genesis, but I did get jealous whenever I saw a Sonic game running. I was very familiar with the hedgehog’s games, and I was always enamored with Green Hill Zone. I remember seeing it in the old show Nick Arcade, too. I also was jealous of any games that seemed better on Genesis than SNES like the Aladdin and Animaniacs games.

        That said, I totally get why everyone who grew up with the original trilogy loves Sonic Mania. It’s a fantastic throwback! I know about Alex Kidd through the Virtual Console, but I’ve never actually played one of his games. Something about the rock, paper, scissors system turned me off. I like the character though and pleasantly surprised to see him included in the Sonic and Sega All-Stars Racing game as a holiday gift! I’d like a new Ristar game, though. Maybe even a better Ecco game!

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  4. Yeah, I still have my VCS, C64, NES, Super NES, etc. Over the years I’ve added a Master System, Genesis, and Dreamcast to the collection So I’ve made up a bit for lost time with some of those games. A couple of the Alex Kidd games are expensive, so I don’t have them. But Miracle world is a lot of fun. With Hyperkin bringing out the Retro 77 by year’s end you may want to give some Atari 2600 games a shot. It’s a 2600 clone system, so it isn’t quite 1:1 but it will hook up via HDMI so you won’t have to try to find workarounds to get it hooked up to a modern TV. The Atari 2600 came out in 1977 before even the age of RCA composite cables (The red yellow white wires you’ve seen since the NES.) It connected via Coaxial cable. On a modern TV that means getting a VCR, hooking the 2600 up to that, then running composite to the TV. If the TV doesn’t even have composite (some new models ONLY have HDMI) then you have to buy an upscaler too, to convert the signal, and connect to a modern TV. So the Retron 77 remedies that. And it will work with the original Joysticks, Paddles, Keypads, and other 2600 controllers. These days the 2600 is pretty inexpensive to collect for, and there are a lot of really fun games you can get for $5 or less. Sometimes you can even find lots with a bunch of the common titles. By today’s standards the visuals are rudimentary, but the gameplay holds up. And there are indie games still being made today. If you have time, check out a game called Zippy The Porcupine. Some genius figured out how to make a Sonic clone for the console. Pretty cool stuff.

    It isn’t as easy to get into Commodore 64 collecting because a lot of retro stores don’t focus on it the way they do for the 2600, NES, Genesis, etc. Mainly because it was a home computer rather than a console. But during the industry crash most of the developers moved to computer platforms, and stayed there until the NES made consoles viable again. So there’s a wealth of great games on it. Including excellent (and not so excellent) versions of games that were on the NES, Master System, 2600, Genesis, and even the Super Nintendo. The C64 ran from 1982 until Commodore went out of business in 1994. So if you find a working one with a good power supply (a bad one can kill the whole computer), a working floppy drive, and/or cassette drive, you’re in for a treat.

    But I’ve begun to ramble. TLDR: Sonic Mania is pretty awesome.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I might have to look into the Retro 77. I have another clone system, the Retron 3, which is the only reason I can play old Sega Genesis games. I’m sure I could get some old Atari games from a used game store, too, so it would all work out. I’d love to play more of the Commodore 64, so it’s a shame that the games are hard to find. I unfortunately no longer have floppies or cassette drives (oh the good old days). I know there are some games from it on the Wii Virtual Console at least, but it’s very few of them. Are there any I should absolutely check out as a platformer fan?

      Also, tl;dr, Sonic Mania is indeed awesome!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Well the obvious choice is The Great Giana Sisters, which started life as a Super Mario clone, but as you play through it you find it makes a lot of its own tweaks, and spins that make it feel different. Even though the core elements are there (Jump into blocks for gems, and power ups.) The thing is it’s one of the very expensive games out there. It was (to my knowledge) released in Europe, and the legend goes, that once Nintendo got wind of it, they sent a cease, and desist to Rainbow Arts (The publisher). Rainbow Arts voluntarily recalled the game. So when copies DO show up on ebay the auctions often go for several hundred dollars or more. You can play the game through emulation thanks to Lemon64 which managed to get the blessing to distribute it from some of the folks who worked on it. Ironically enough the creator Armin Gessert would bury the hatchet with Nintendo, and get out a sequel on the Nintendo DS in 2009. He passed away not long after, sadly. The remnants of his studio founded Black Forest Games, and put out the excellent Giana Sisters Twisted Dreams, which plays nothing like SMB, and is one of the best platformers ever made IMHO.

        But I digress. There are a lot of platformers on the C64. Ollie, and Lisa is an early collectathon. There’s excellent versions of Rainbow Islands, Spellunker, Montezuma’s Revenge, Bubble Bobble. There’s Flimbo’s Quest, The Dizzy games (Some were ported to the NES, and Genesis.) Jumpman, Jumpman Junior, Pitfall II: Lost Caverns (Also on the Atari 2600 where it’s a technological marvel) Turrican, Turrican 2, The Last Ninja Trilogy, Caverns Of Khafka, Arc Of Yesod, Nodes of Yesod, Those are off the top of my head. Some are more like Metroid esque adventures than bump n’ jump platforming. Others are more action platforming.

        This video is kind of old, but it does a great job of showing off some cool games. (I didn’t make it.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eY2gK1MPgh8

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I admire your knowledge of these classic C64 games! I have indeed heard of the The Great Giana Sisters, and I know that they have at least one remake on Nintendo systems. I doubt they’re as good as the original, but that’s one I’ll look out for. The legend between Nintendo and Rainbow Arts only makes it more intriguing. I’ve heard of some of the games you mentioned, but a few them are new to me, so thanks for imparting your knowledge. And thanks for sharing the video too! I never realized just how many games the system had!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. No problem! It also has a lot of great European exclusives, some of which mentioned already. The thing is, like a lot of EU stuff you have to worry about PAL Vs. NTSC when buying games. PAL games generally work on NTSC models, but the frequency difference means PAL games will have glitches, run faster, or display in monochrome. So purists will import a second Commodore 64 setup, and TV or monitor to avoid this. I can’t recommend going that far unless you love Commodore 64 gaming 100x more than I do though. There were still plenty of great North American releases anyway. Some of the earliest games also came on cartridge. Anyway I don’t mean to hijack the comments section. But yeah, if you can find a setup, with everything good, and working, the C64 is an amazing retro platform to collect for.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Interesting that there were so many EU exclusives. I unfortunately wouldn’t be able to get all that equipment, but I will still seek C64 systems and games next chance I get! Who knew that I’d learn so much about a classic retro system today? Thanks man! Also, thanks Sonic haha!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. I lived for this series on the Genesis back in the day. I’ve been sort of a lapsed Sonic gamer since then due to not having the subsequent Sega consoles and then never jumping back in too much when they started appearing on other consoles. I’m really excited to play this one though. Sounds awesome.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It’s great to hear from someone who loved the original games back in the day! I grew up with Nintendo and didn’t get a chance to properly play the series until Sonic went third party and appeared on GameCube. I’m very interested in hearing what you think as a lapsed Sonic gamer! I hope it lives up to your memories of the good old days! 😀

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      1. I did, though I don’t remember them too much. I think I mostly watched Kris play them. But I do remember, at our old dentist, they had the arcade Sonic and we used to play that while we waited to be called.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Ooh, an arcade machine at a dentist’s office? How fun that must have been! I’ve never seen the arcade version of Sonic in person, but I used to watch this old kids’ game show called Nick Arcade that featured it. Looked like the Genesis game!

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      3. It’s an old Nickelodeon game show where kids talked answered trivia questions and played arcade challenges. I only remember it because I would always get excited when someone chose to play Sonic the Hedgehog. Most kids had trouble collecting and keeping rings, though. Maybe it wasn’t a good representative display for me haha.

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      4. Oh, okay, I don’t think I’ve seen it, but I vaguely remember it.
        I used to watch a really good show, but I can’t remember what it was called. It was on Nickelodeon and called something-Temple… which has nothing to do with video games, but it was still a cool Nick show, lol.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Legends of the Hidden Temple! I used to love that show! They’re making a new movie based on that show, which is ridiculous and nostalgic at the same time. I just want to see how the kids in the movie handle putting together the monkey haha.

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  6. I have not played this game, but it seems to continue some of the ideas from the older Sonic games. I remember the games available on the Mega Drive used some detailed, multi-layered backgrounds, so it was interesting that the pictures in this review show levels I am familiar with, but with added features and more creative background designs. The graphics look familiar, but better quality. I remember the Sonic games used to prioritise a high speed gameplay (which may be a reason why the 3D games were not as popular). I like that the game uses old stages, but develops new features with them, but I would have thought that the game should use a new special stage design. With the old games, the special stages changed between the games and helped differentiate between each game.
    Is there actually a story shown in the game? Does the game begin in some luscious hill? Does Sonic still visit a casino? What are the new levels? How does the game use special effects?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Great questions! Let me get them one by one.

      Is there actually a story shown in the game? Yes, and I show some of the cutscenes in my video. But it’s super light. No dialogue or any semblance of a bigger plot. It’s the same old Eggman is invading Sonic land, with the added element of dimensional travel so that Sonic has an excuse to revisit old zones.

      Does the game begin in some luscious hill? Not just any hill, but THE Green Hill Zone from Sonic the Hedgehog 1.

      Does Sonic still visit a casino? Not really, this time. He visits areas that resemble casinos, though. I’d be fooled by the dazzling lights.

      What are the new levels? There are four levels, and I’ll only mention the three that I displayed in my video: Studiopolis (TV station), Press Garden (a garden combined with a newspaper printing company… on ice), and Mirage Saloon (Wild West). By the way, two of the images are also from the new levels!

      How does the game use special effects? What do you mean?

      I agree that new special stages would have been nice! I can understand the nostalgia factor, though. I mean, eight zones are already the same. Why not reuse two special stages? It’s a shame, but I don’t mind it as much since I don’t really play Sonic for the special stages. Thanks for your comments and questions!

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      1. Gotcha. So if you’re asking what kind of stage special effects there are, the games goes all out with both old and new gimmicks. Some of my favorites are the bouncy platforms in Chemical Plant Zone, the light tricks you mentioned in Studiopolis, riding a plane in Mirage Saloon, disappearing and reappearing blocks (a la Mega Man), and several boss battles that are references to completely other Sega games or events, which I won’t spoil. There are also a few in particular in the later stages that I liked. Again, I won’t spoil, but one involves changing Sonic’s sprite, and another deals with a time-related gimmick originating in Sonic CD. Hope that answered your question?

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  7. Great review! The Sega gag at the beginning made me laugh out loud. Also, I’m ashamed to say I’ve never played a 2D Sonic. Only Sonic Adventure 2: Battle on GC, which I did enjoy! Poor Shadow, so misunderstood!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you very much my friend! I’m glad you appreciate the Sega gag in my video haha! I just had to do it. 😉 You’d probably like 2D Sonic, but if I may make a recommendation based on what you like, how about Sonic Adventure DX on GameCube? It’s the first 3D Sonic, and I enjoyed it. Sonic also did the walking around with life-size humans first. Take that Super Mario Odyssey! And you get to play as Big the Cat, who does a fishing minigame! 😛

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  8. Nice review! I also loved the game. I didn’t experience any of the glitches you mentioned, but I did have one where pressing the home button wouldn’t do anything for several seconds, which is bizarre considering how snappy the Switch usually is.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks a lot! I did experience that once or twice too, which was very annoying. I think it affected my capture button too, which made it difficult to take pictures. You’re right that the Switch is usually snappy, so something was up with the game’s performance, for sure!

      Like

  9. I have yet to download this game on my Switch, but I know it’s a must, I like your positive outlook and the fact that you mentioned how this game came to be. I think that was important information seeing as how it’s development is unique.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you very much! I felt that for this game, it was important to talk about its unique creation story. It helps paint a complete picture of why certain things are the way they are, such as Whitehead’s physics engine and the referential throwbacks. I’m glad you appreciate it! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Yesssss! You’re lucky that you grew up playing Sonic! This game is indeed amazing, and I say that as someone who didn’t play Sonic until he went third party and got on GameCube. This is probably heresy, but I like it even more than the originals. Perhaps it’s because I don’t have the nostalgia, but I also find it more approachable thanks to the save systems that wasn’t in the original games until Sonic the Hedgehog 3. I hope you enjoy it, and I would love to hear what you think since you have more experience with Sonic than me! Thanks as always for your wonderful comments TSN! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I grew up always hearing about Sonic but never really had the opportunity to play the games myself. However in recent years like the past ten years I’ve been rotating towards it more and more often and looking forward to playing this. As always, incredible review!! Insightful, educational, entertaining and inspirational.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Aww thank you so much for your wonderfully kind comments! I didn’t grow up with Sega and Sonic games, but I did eventually get to play them one the company went third party. I like the games, but I truly think Sonic Mania is a special title that embraces the series while being totally approachable. If this were my first Sonic game, I’d have a very positive first impression of the franchise. I definitely recommend it even if you haven’t played Sonic!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I admire his passion for Sonic, and it looks like a lot of fans and Sega itself shares that sentiment! This has to be a true dream game for Christian Whitehead and everyone involved. Thanks for your comments! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    1. It is awesome! Honestly, probably not as alluring as Metroid, but an awesome game for fans of the series and newcomers. Are you a big Sonic fan? I didn’t grow up with Sega, so I didn’t actually start playing Sonic games until he went third-party. Fell in love with the Sonic Adventure and Advance games, though!

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  11. Great review! I got the game for the Switch myself and I played the hell out of it! Honestly, they need to make more of these. My only gripe was that there were so few original stages… they could’ve added one or two more to make it more balanced, but eh, who’s complaining? 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you very much! Glad to hear you enjoyed it! I completely agree that there aren’t enough original zones, though I am still impressed with how they changed up each zone. But yeah, 50% new zones would have been a better balance. Thanks for your great comments! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you as always for your consistent support both here and on the YouTube channel! It always means so much to me, as you know! 🙂 Sonic Mania is a pretty looking game, and it sounds great too! Even uses a variation of our PANDA jingle! 😛

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It might be a Switch thing. I also had some problems accessing the home menu and taking screenshots, and I know that’s been a regular problem since launch. Good to hear the PS4 version has worked well for you! I agree that it’s a good handheld title. I’m thankful the Switch is basically handheld!

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