Super Mario Run (Mobile) Review

Mario’s Mobile Marvel

When Apple held its iPhone 7 event in September 2016, nobody could have guessed that Nintendo’s own Shigeru Miyamoto would come on stage to debut a new Mario game for smartphones. While Miitomo, Fire Emblem Heroes, and Niantic’s Pokémon GO signify visible steps for Nintendo’s mobile movement, witnessing the company’s most popular mascot grace the iPhone screen is still astonishing. Yet here we are with Super Mario Run, Mario’s take on the automatic runner genre.

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Run Mario Run

If you’ve played an auto-run platformer before, you’ll understand the gameplay immediately. Mario automatically runs through the level, and you tap the screen to make him jump. You can tap multiple times to jump off walls or perform spin-jumps to give Mario extra air time. Otherwise, Mario independently chugs along on his own. Speed-altering blocks spice the game up, and unstompable deathtraps like Fire Bars prevent it from becoming a cakewalk. However, your role is simply to facilitate Mario on his tour to the flagpole. Fans of other sidescroller games may be hesitant based on that description, and their fears are merited. Super Mario Run is not a traditional Mario game in the slightest. If you go into it expecting Super Mario World, you may be disappointed. It’s better to think of it as an arcade game that utilizes traditional Mario elements to guide its direction.

As a huge 2D Mario fan, there were times when I felt that the game missed the mark. While auto-running is the main gameplay tenet, the lack of control is frustrating, especially when you want to go back and explore. There’s an option to go into a bubble to float backwards, but it uses up one of your limited “lives.” Equally disappointing is Mario’s momentum. Although you are always “running,” the pace is slower than a typical Mario title. This game doesn’t have to be Sonic fast, but the exhilarating sense of swiftness is lost here. As a result. Mario veterans may find the game a bit dull. Another unsettling discrepancy is that Mario automatically vaults over enemies when you get close. If you tap while he’s over the enemy, he stomps it and gains air. This design feels counterintuitive because you must resist the natural urge to jump before reaching an enemy.

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Wall Kicks Will Work.

You get the picture. This isn’t the traditional experience, but there is beauty to be found in the game’s unmistakable Mario elements. Negatives aside, this is a decent representation of what Mario should feel like on a controller-less platform. The jump physics are familiar and polished. Each hop feels satisfying and bouncing on baddies in succession is oh-so-gratifying. The level design is spot on for this new control style. Stages are more compact, so there’s a lot going on in each screen. There’s also a good variety of level mechanics, such as hitting P-Switches to produce a block path or navigating your way through the puzzling Ghost Houses. The game even somehow fits in vertical levels, a rarity for the auto-runner genre. Part of the series’ appeal comes from making precise movements, and Super Mario Run is all about timing. Making it unscathed through the carefully placed enemies is tougher than it seems. While I ragged on the game’s speed, I praise it for its flow. Mario must have practiced parkour because he hurdles over blocks and grabs ledges like a pro. These alterations to standard Mario mechanics show that the developers understood how to transition to automatic platforming.

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Jumping’s just as fun in an auto-run.

Just as the game ramps up, it suddenly ends. With a scant 24 levels, the main World Tour mode doesn’t last long… unless you collect the special coins. Like the series’ Star/Dragon Coins, there are five pink coins hidden in each stage. You have to search carefully and choose the correct paths to find the collectibles, which can be annoying considering you can’t go backwards (without using up a bubble). Nevertheless, collecting the coins in one run provides a great challenge, and it’s interesting to see how your gameplay changes as a result. Your reward for obtaining every coin is doing it all over again with new coin placements, and then again after that. While I would have preferred more stages to playing each one thrice, the progressively difficult coin challenges were sufficiently entertaining.

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Toad Rally (a.k.a. New Super Mario Bros. 2 VS. Mode)

Toad Rally and Kingdom Builder round out the package but aren’t as fun or developed. In Toad Rally, you “compete” against random opponents or friends to collect coins in looping versions of the levels. I use “compete” loosely because you don’t actually play in real-time. Rather, you’re playing against an AI-controlled ghost of your opponent as you would in Mario Kart’s Time Trials. When you collect a certain threshold of coins, you enter Coin Rush, a blazing event in which many more coins suddenly appear for a limited time. By chaining enemy kills and stylishly navigating the level, you also gain support from Toads who cheer you on and give you more coins. Whomever obtains the most coins by the end wins and gains Toads.

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My Kingdom is stuck in a perpetual Christmas.

Toads are important for the game’s Kingdom Builder, in which you purchase and place buildings in your custom field. Some buildings offer great bonuses, like special levels and characters with desirable abilities. However, to get facilities, you must have a certain amount of coins and Toads, so winning Toad Rallies is crucial. This sounds like a fun loop until you realize how many Toads/coins you need. It’s not exorbitant, but with only 24 levels to choose from, you’ll be grinding the same levels over and over. Mario and grinding should never mix. It’s worth noting that you need tickets from the main game to attempt Toad Rally, though it’s easy to reach the maximum 99.

The graphics are fair, to say the least, reusing assets from the New Super Mario Bros. (NSMB) series. The music, on the other hand, consists of nicely remixed tunes from NSMB, which sound well-suited for a game in constant motion. As a final note, the app requires you to be online to play. It’s a bit silly, but as long as you have a connection, you should be fine.

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Poor Goomba… Even the game’s logo hurts him.

Super Mario Run is a pleasant surprise. It thankfully lacks the microtransactions that plague other mobile affairs, and instead has a fixed, fairly low price tag. The amount of content is somewhat low but justifies the cost as long as you don’t mind playing through levels repeatedly. It’s not the Mario you grew up with, but it’s a great example on how to translate a game that still relishes in its roots. If anything, Super Mario Run shows Nintendo’s ability to adapt one of its core franchises to a new genre and platform.

Score: 7/10

Note: The iOS Version 1.0.2 was used for this review.

What are your thoughts on Super Mario Run? What would you like to see in Nintendo’s mobile games? Please share what you think in the comments below! Thanks for reading!

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84 thoughts on “Super Mario Run (Mobile) Review

  1. Great review. Honestly, one of the most in-depth I’ve read on Mario Run. As a huge Mario fan, but an Android user, I have to wait until March to check it out. I’m intrigued enough to at least play the free portion of the game, but with an extensive library on Vita and 3DS, I’m not in any hurry to drop $10 on another to-go experience. I’m intrigued, but I’m not sold yet. Maybe the free trial will sell me?

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    1. Thank you very much for your kind words! The free portion is a very good indicator of whether you’ll like it. If you at least have fun with the demo, then the price tag is really not that bad. I’m a huge Mario fan, and I liked but not loved it. It’s a fair to-go experience, but it feels very middle-of-the-road as far as those go. I either want something less taxing or really engaging for a portable experience, which I can actually do with handheld Mario games. The free trial is worth checking out, and I’d love to hear what you think if you do get the whole thing! Thanks for your awesome comments!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Nintendo sure is getting buddy buddy with Apple, having Shigeru Miyamoto on stage during an event! I thought Fire Emblem Heroes was going to be a reverse of that situation with Android versions coming out long before iOS, but then that wasn’t the case. I guess this is what Nintendo on another platform looks like, so hopefully we don’t see Nintendo ever going third-party.

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  2. I can’t sat that I enjoyed the game as much as you did. if the price tag was lower, maybe I would l have felt better. I saw where they were going with having it online only, though. Fighting them pirates. But when I get a more complete game on my 3DS or phone by “other means”, this is just a disappointment.

    As they would say in Hot Shots golf 4, “Nice Approach”

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yup, I liked the game, but did not love it. And as a huge Mario fan, this doesn’t quite meet the standards of what I look for in Mario. It’s a great conversion to a mobile platform, and does have moments of genuine fun. But I, too, prefer a more engaging full Mario experience, or at least one that gives me full control of those wonderful Mario physics. More than the price, I think the low content was an issue. If it were cheaper, yes the price might be justified more, but this felt more like an experiment and ended before they got to the exciting ideas that come in Mario postgame. Depending on “competitions” to increase game time is not how I play Mario either. It is certainly a “nice approach” though! And yes, it’s probably a piracy issue, but an unfortunate result too since I wouldn’t always have online when I’m traveling. Thanks for reading and commenting!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Glad to hear you enjoyed this one. It was sort of a bummer for me but it wasn’t really what I’m looking for in a Mario title. I think Fire Emblem will be the first mobile title from Nintendo to really grab me. Great review, keep it up!

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    1. Thanks a bunch! While I did like it, I didn’t enjoy it as much as I would a traditional Mario game. I think it’s more reverence for making an auto-runner fun for me. I’m looking forward to Fire Emblem Heroes too, and I hope that it will satiate my FE taste! Thanks again!

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  4. Awesome review! You give a thorough breakdown of the important elements of the game. Definitely interesting to see Nintendo branching out into the mobile app world. I’m not much into mobile games–with the exception of Pokémon Go and Miitomo last year. I don’t know if I’m ready to invest $10 into the full version, but sounds like the free version is worth checking out. Nicely done!

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    1. Thanks so much for your kind words, as always! Nintendo’s forays into the mobile world are interesting. They have the Nintendo charm, but they definitely don’t have the lasting power as their main console/handheld titles. I’m not much into mobile games either and mostly delved into these for the brand alone. I’ve played endless runners, which are a bit different from Super Mario Run, and they weren’t particularly compelling for me. I do like Mario Run, but part of it is just the care Nintendo puts into its level design and overall feel. Brand certainly means a lot when it comes to mobile games, so Nintendo was wise to utilize their most popular mascot! Here’s to Fire Emblem and Animal Crossing continuing the Nintendo smartphone trend!

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  5. I’m so glad to read something on SMRun from someone who I know shares fairly similar perspectives as me. When this was first announced, I didn’t know what to make of it. I knew right away that it was a game I wouldn’t play. I think you encapsulated my apprehension when you wrote: “As a huge 2D Mario fan, there were times when I felt that the game missed the mark” and “Mario and grinding should never mix.” I’m happy that Mario made the leap to become more accessible through mobile gaming, and I can respect Run for what it is, but it’s not for me, it seems. Thanks for the read.

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    1. Of course! Thank you for reading and commenting too! I respect Super Mario Run for what it is too, and I found some genuine enjoyment out of it. But yes, as a fan, it doesn’t quite hold my interest like a good old 2D Mario does. It definitely misses the point of why I enjoy Mario games. Regardless, I’m sure others who don’t play as many Mario games may enjoy the gameplay. It’s certainly better than some other “runners” I’ve played on phones.

      Mario Run is not a true Mario game, but I don’t believe it’s trying to be either. If this mobile app introduces more people to Mario, then that’s great. I’ll enjoy my traditional 2D Marios and wait for Super Mario Odyssey. Thanks again for your insightful comments and for sharing your thoughts! I appreciate it a lot!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. That seems to be its market appeal, geared for a wider audience who don’t normally play retro games or anything. I’ve never played a runner, being not much of a mobile gamer, so the novelty was somewhat lost on me. Super Mario Odyssey looks great!

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      2. Super Mario Odyssey looks so great, and I’m excited for what looks like a return to 3D form for the Mario series! I’m not a big fan of mobile gaming either, but I know a large portion of the world is now. This game did fairly well as far as mobile games go, so I’m not that surprised that it appealed to many. I dove in too, but obviously, I didn’t enjoy it as much as traditional Mario. Well, we’ll see how it pays off for them in the end. As long as they keep making great traditional Mario games, then I’m happy!

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  6. Reblogged this on Miketendo64! The News, Reviews & Personal Views Website On All Things Nintendo and commented:

    Hey everyone, Mr. Panda here with a review of Super Mario Run, an auto-run platformer you can play on your smartphone! When Nintendo first announced its plan to make mobile games, people weren’t sure whether Nintendo would actually make a Mario game. Yet here we are with their second phone game starring their biggest mascot. Read on to find out what a huge Mario fan like me thinks of this mobile version!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The content is indeed on the lower side, though I’ve definitely played games around that price point or higher that were shorter or less polished. Either way, I do prefer a one-time $9.99 fee to microtransactions and waiting around, which is what it looked like they were going for with the Toad Rally tickets.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I can see your point. I don’t do mobile gaming much, so I’m obviously not the target audience.

        Just makes me think of the ports of games like Final Fantasy to mobile. For a similar price, I could get a full game port. Obviously, Super Mario Run is a new title, but the price makes me think of comparing price with the quality and amount of content.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Truth be told, I don’t do mobile gaming much at all either and am probably not the target audience for this. I avoided the Final Fantasy mobile ports because that’s just not how I envisioned playing the games. For Super Mario Run, I think that was a case of me actually trying out the mobile game instead of ignoring it first, which helped me see the merits of what Nintendo tried with their bold move. Nintendo has that kind of brand power, it seems, haha. As far as price goes, it really is relative then because some people would rather have a new Mario game than a full game port that isn’t necessarily designed for buttonless controls. I try not to make price too big a deal and just focus on the fact that the content is a bit low and that there are discrepancies between how Mario controls in here versus traditional games. The price is worth it if you want an experience like this, and I would say it’s a fine price. But if you don’t want it or even worse, bought it and don’t like it, then yes it is high considering the price of other games on the mobile market. I thought it was priced decently, Mario tax and all, haha.

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      3. There are definitely a lot of people that really like it, a lot more than me. On both camps of the Mario fandom too. And good for them too. I’m more of a middle road person for this game, appreciating it for what it is and accepting that the series doesn’t have to conform to my every expectation about Mario.

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      1. Agreed! They easily could have played the microtransactions game too. In fact, they were probably planning to based on the Toad Rally ticket system. I’m glad they’re not doing it, but that’s probably why people aren’t easing up to Super Mario Run as much as other “free-to-play” titles. Good on them!

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  7. Nice review! I wasn’t going to bother with this game, but you’ve convinced me to at least give it a try (if it ever comes to Android). I’m not really a fan of endless runners or mobile games in general ( and I test cell phones as a job by the way, haha). Mario can make anything good it seems 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Awesome, thank you so much! It’s slated for March for Android. Great timing on Nintendo’s part, since the Switch will be out then, haha. I kid. But yes, I’m not a big mobile gaming fan. In contrast, I am a huge Mario fan, at least his traditional platformers. This is a pretty good marriage of the two, though Mario is obviously the real appeal. I don’t know if they could have done that much better besides making it longer and changing some of the running mechanics, but I believe this shows that Mario on mobile is quite doable. If you do try it out, assuming you even want to look at cell phones anymore (haha!), let me know what you think! You’re right that Mario makes anything good… as long as it’s not the CD-i disaster, Hotel Mario, haha!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. At least it is eventually coming for Android 🙂 I was actually shocked to see Nintendo start doing Mobile games. After work, I generally throw my cell phone on the table and ignore it for the night, haha. I would enjoy seeing Mario on it though.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Yes, it’s good that Nintendo isn’t ignoring the Android users, especially after its big buddy-buddy announcement at the Apple event, haha! It’s probably a good thing to ignore your cell phone after a long day looking at them. Mario’s probably a good reason to look though, haha. It’s shocking to see Nintendo doing mobile games, but it looks like it’s going decently for them so far. It’s probably brand power, but they did a decent job converting Mario. Hopefully, they apply that same effort to Fire Emblem Heroes and the upcoming Animal Crossing mobile game!

        Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you! It’s certainly a bit light, though I thought the price was fine considering Nintendo could have gone the microtransaction route. It did leave me wanting more, which does mean that I did like it while it lasted!

      Liked by 2 people

  8. This game doesn’t look too bad and I wouldn’t mind trying it, but the price shunned me away from it. Maybe when I get an iTunes gift card or something I’ll download it. But they’re also coming out with so many game apps now that I feel like my iPad is going to turn into another Nintendo console.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It’s worth a try, considering it starts out free. The first three free levels are a good indication of whether you’d like the style, although it admittedly gets better later on. Not that it’s a long game to begin with. I didn’t think the price was too bad, but I’m used to getting $40-60 games, some of which are low-content too. I guess it’s expensive compared to most other “free” apps, but I’m also glad that Nintendo didn’t go the “free-to-play” route like they easily could have with the Toad Rally Tickets. As far as Nintendo and Pokemon Company’s app takeover is going, I actually wouldn’t mind having my iPhone as a makeshift Nintendo device, haha!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. My main problem with Toad Rally is that the reward system and long-term playability are a bit ill-conceived. Ultimately the purple and yellow toads take the longest to accumulate so you only end up playing half the level sets (blue and green toads can be earned well enough playing the airship levels). I understand the idea of theming toad colors to level sets but it backfires.

    There’s also really no point to keep playing Toad Rally after you’ve gotten all the special buildings (minus the cake, nobody has time for that). It becomes outplayed by that point. An endless mode would have gone a long way in this regard, maybe one that even switches between level sets as it goes.

    That said, for $10 I found this to still be a very solid package. The levels were brilliantly designed to take advantage of the auto-runner aspect and getting all the special coins provided a nice challenge. I’ve exhausted the content so I don’t see myself going back to it but it lasted me more hours than games I’ve paid more for have.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for your solid comments! Yes, I agree on that flaw of Toad Rally. I wish it were more even, but I ended up playing just airship levels which is a fraction of the already low level count. And yes, there is also no point of playing Toad Rally after you’ve gotten everything. Though I’ll admit that I haven’t gotten everything mostly because I didn’t feel compelled to continue Toad Rally. I know people who have gotten 9999 Toads, and that’s no problem if they enjoy it. I just don’t see the appeal of grinding “competition” levels in a Mario game. I did the grinding for the gold in New Super Mario Bros. 2, and that was a waste.

      I do think that $10 is fair though. The content is small, but it’s pretty good. The developers understood how to translate Mario to mobile. There were a few mechanics lost in translation, but otherwise, they nailed the feel. Special coin collecting was my favorite part of the package by far. Without it, I would say that there just wasn’t enough. I’m glad to hear that you enjoyed the game and found value in it! Thanks again for reading and commenting! I appreciate it!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I wish Nintendo did a better job promoting the special coins as many of those levels change pretty significantly for new coin layouts. It might have eased some of the people who didn’t think the game had enough content (also because a lot of these people wouldn’t realize there was more to the whole package than just the 24 levels).

        Liked by 2 people

      2. I guess it being a game you could play on one hand was more important to them, haha. I agree that the special coins could have been promoted more though. I had to do a double-take on the ghost house levels in particular. Each level was like three levels in one! Regardless, I’m not sure playing a level thrice would convince players that there were a lot of content, regardless of the big level changes. they would have had to triple the level count to appease, though that would have likely come at a higher cost.

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Yeah. For the price I really don’t think $10 is asking too much, especially when compared to other Mario games. I also feel the mobile space has enabled this incredibly spoiled consumer culture (I wrote about that stuff professionally for three years before it really became what it is today) but that’s a whole other conversation entirely.

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Haha, yes, you’re right. It’s like what Iwata had said years ago about trying not to devalue their games. Mario is already at $10, and people are still upset. While the content is indeed much better in traditional Mario titles, I wonder how people feel about spending $60 on those games. Regardless, I’m happy that those who put the money down and enjoyed it got their money’s worth. I can also see other’s qualms at paying $10 for something they’re not sure they want. At the end of the day, it’s a mobile game. I don’t know how much of it is a spoiled culture, but I believe people really do devalue how much games are worth and how much resources and manpower go into making these games.

        Liked by 2 people

  10. I liked it and was addicted for the first week! I think it’s especially appealing to me as I enjoy playing regular Mario platformers but I kind of suck at them…this gives me a similar experience but dumbed down a bit so I don’t feel as frustrated, haha. Definitely worth my $10!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes, it’s definitely important that Super Mario Run is approachable for players who have difficulties with Mario’s traditional controls. It’s a fun alternative. Mario’s world is appealing, so of course, there are many who want to play it but have a tough time getting in. From the perspective of a big Mario player, I liked it but didn’t find it to be the best Mario could be. But I know I’m probably not quite their target audience. I’m glad that you found a lot of enjoyment out of your $10! Thanks for your awesome comments!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s not really an endless runner per se, but very understandable why it wouldn’t be up everyone’s alley. It’s definitely not my go-to Mario game, but I’m glad I tried it out. It’s an interesting conversion, and I hope that Fire Emblem Heroes’ conversion to mobile is even better! I’m definitely interested in that too!

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks a lot for reading and commenting! Yes, if it’s not your thing, then $10 is probably not worth it. But if it even interests you, the price is really not that bad for what it is. It’s nice to see Mario branching out. If they do another Mario game, maybe they can add more content, smooth out the speed, and add more incentive to the additional modes. Thanks again!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. No worries at all! Maybe I might reconsider paying that $10 and give it another go because I did enjoy playing this. And you only have to pay for it once and you get full access anyways, unlike other mobile games. But for future games I would definitely agree that they need to add more content.

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      2. I’m actually impressed by the restraint Nintendo had by not including microtransactions. The Toad Rally ticket system makes it seem like it was planned at one point, but they opted for a flat fee instead, which works better for me.

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  11. It looks fun! Not traditional Mario, but definitely something I’d give a try. When you said it was auto-running, I immediately thought of The Impossible Game, but then when you mentioned the speed, Mario Run is much slower (and far less impossible). It seems like it would be decent for the mobile platform, which everyone is trying to get a piece of lately 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes! It’s not quite as impossible or fast as others in the genre. Funny enough, Mario has previously verged into auto-runner territory with some New Super Mario Bros. 2 (3DS) stages and they were good! Mario went really fast because he was being shot out of a cannon. You still had control, but good luck controlling him at that speed! Super Mario Run is slower than that, but still has its moments! Definitely earned that piece of mobile pie! Thanks for reading and commenting!

      Liked by 2 people

  12. Sorry. I haven’t been on a ton lately and just now catching up with the stuff you posted so… you may be in for some comment spam as I look through what I missed. I’m pretty late to the game on this one too, as the hype is pretty much dead already. I simply played the free version of the game for a few days but didn’t see enough to warrant the purchase for myself personally. I guess I’d rather see something that will work a little better with a mobile platform, like a puzzle game or turn-based RPG. Personally I find that touch controls aren’t that precise for action games. But hey, that’s just me and my stupid, fat fingers. Also, what is this Fire Emblem mobile game? I don’t even think I heard about that.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Super Mario Run is certainly not for everyone, but it seems like Nintendo knows its target audience for this, particularly those who want some Mario on a commuter train. I’m not normally one for mobile touch controls. What makes it work here is the fact that you can touch anywhere to make Mario jump. Sidescrollers with traditional d-pad controls typically suffer during the transition to mobile touch controls. This game’s developers wisely chose a control scheme that fits the platform, but doesn’t completely change the essence behind Mario. It works for both the game and the target audience.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Great review! I downloaded the demo shortly after the game came out but I have yet to actually play it! I wasn’t sure if I wanted to spend $9.99 on a mobile game, but I give them props for making it a flat price instead of going the (extremely annoying) microtransaction route! Who knows, maybe they will update the game later with more levels! I think I will probably end up buying the full game. After all, I did get an iTunes gift card for Christmas that I need to use! 😉

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much! I appreciate your kind words! I actually never thought of them updating the game with more levels, but that’s an awesome idea that I can get behind! I know they update the Kingdom Builder with new buildings and decorations, but new levels would really be icing on the cake! And an iTunes gift card! How lucky! 😀

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    1. Thank you very much! It’s definitely worth a try even if it’s not your thing. It’s not really my thing either, but I surprisingly found aspects that I liked to. Of course, I prefer a traditional Mario game, but I think this was a solid attempt! Thanks again!

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  14. I definitely agree with the 7. At least for the full game it is pretty fun. It would be nice if it was a little longer, but I’m sure Nintendo is already thinking about a sequel. It is definitely neat that they’re exploring the mobile market and I’m really hoping for a Super Smash mobile game now. That’d be totally awesome!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks! Glad you think so too! I think Nintendo could do a good job with a sequel if they added more content and improved the modes. A Super Smash Bros. mobile game sounds interesting! I don’t know how they’d make the touch screen controls work, but I’d play this if they could figure it out!

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  15. Great review! An auto-runner Mario game just seemed like an oxymoron to me, but I kind of understand why they did it, what with Japanese commuters typically only having one hand free to play the game. Still, I think it’s promising to see Nintendo dipping their toes in the mobile market with micro-transactionless games, though $9.99 feels a little hefty for 24 levels for me. I’m having some doubts about getting the game from what I’ve seen of it but you’ve convinced me to at least give the free version a shot when it comes out on Android.

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    1. Thank you! It really makes sense from a Japanese commuter perspective. I appreciate that Nintendo stayed away from microtransactions for this one, and I hope they continue that for future games. I already know Fire Emblem Heroes is a microtransaction affair, so there’s no getting around that. The price for 24 levels isn’t as bad when you realize that ~80 levels is usually around $40-60. The difference is that levels in New Super Mario Bros. games are fully featured and offer Mario full control. So yes, the 24 mobile levels’ price is still a little high, but it’s not as bad as you think. Awesome that you’ll try it out! I’d love to hear what you think! Thanks again for your awesome comments!

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  16. Great post! Typical of the internet, people have been quick to talk the game down by considering it a lazy knock off mobile version of a beloved series. I’ve played the game myself and was pleasantly surprised. By no means does it replace the original games but instead tries a mechanic that works well for the traditionally one command mobile games that exist in the market.

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    1. Thank you very much! I agree! While Super Mario Run isn’t a replacement for traditional Mario, it isn’t a lazy knock off version either. It has its merits as what it is, and I’m glad you see that too. I’ve tried to play traditional platformers on phones before, and it’s hard. I can’t tell where the “buttons” are, and I mess up easy commands sometimes. The one-button gameplay works because the system calls for it. It’s like how Nintendo operates with their own consoles. They make games that fit what their systems are capable of. At least they do their best to! Thanks again!

      Liked by 1 person

  17. I would love for Nintendo to have a lot of interactivity between their mobile apps and console games. It could go really far in terms of features, but I’d prefer it to be not so needed to the point it gives someone a much high advantage in whatever Nintendo game.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s an interesting idea! What do you mean by interactivity between apps and console games? Like having what you do in the mobile game unlock things in the console games? And vice versa? It could be similar to how they handle amiibo as physical DLC. But yes, in cases where you could get huge advantages in multiplayer, I could see it being somewhat unfair. Thanks for sharing your ideas!

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      1. That would certainly be interesting! As long as it wasn’t just pay-to-win content, which is almost the case with the mobile game, Fire Emblem Heroes. I’d definitely love to see a working system that ties together their mobile and console games, especially since we already have a My Nintendo system that unifies the accounts.

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